New Supreme Court rulings boost judge discretion in considering federal sentencing guidelines, while the U.S. Sentencing Commission has moved to reduce dramatic guideline disparity between crack and powder cocaine offenses. But only Congress has the power to address disparities in the mandatory minimum sentences for these and other crimes.

Guests

  • Timothy J. Heaphy attorney in private practice; former federal prosecutor (served as Assistant U.S. Attorney in both the District of Columbia and the Western District of Virginia)
  • Julie Stewart president, Families Against Mandatory Minimums
  • Judge Reggie B. Walton United States District Judge for the District of Columbia

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