Mississippi will ask voters next week to decide whether to give legal status to fertilized human eggs. If the ballot measure is approved, abortion would become tantamount to murder. And in vitro fertility clinics and popular methods of birth control could be outlawed. Many observers deem it one of the gravest assaults on women’s reproductive rights in decades. Similar efforts to redefine “personhood” are in the works in several states. Colorado voters twice defeated personhood initiatives recently. But many expect the Mississippi measure to pass. We’ll talk about the latest tactics in the battle against abortion.

Guests

  • Walter Hoye a spokesman for PersonhoodUSA; president of the Issues4Life Foundation and the California Civil Rights Foundation.
  • Jon Fasman Atlanta correspondent for the Economist.
  • Suzanne Novak senior staff attorney, Center for Reproductive Rights.
  • Robert Destro professor of law; director, Interdisciplinary Program in Law & Religion Columbus School of Law, The Catholic University of America.

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