An estimated 2.5 million people work as in-home health and personal aides for the elderly and disabled in this country. Tasks include helping with meals and bathing, light cleaning and companionship. These services can allow an elderly person to postpone or avoid costlier nursing home care. As baby boomers age, demand for this kind of care is projected to rise significantly. But in many states, in-home health care providers earn less than minimum wage and are not entitled to overtime. What the shortage of caregivers means for patients, their families and the home health care industry.

Guests

  • Bruce Vladeck former director of Medicare and Medicaid during the Clinton administration.
  • Val Halamandaris president of the National Association for Home Care and Hospice.
  • Carol Regan government affairs director at PHI, Paraprofessional Healthcare Institute.
  • Susan Dentzer senior policy adviser at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and on-air analyst on health issues for the PBS NewsHour.

Topics + Tags

Comments

comments powered by Disqus
Most Recent Shows

Efforts to Improve The Way We Die

Friday, Feb 17 2017Diane speaks with Dr. Roger Kligler who is living with advanced stage cancer on why he's suing the state of Massachusetts for the 'Right to Die' and with Dr Jessica Vitter, and intensive care and palliative care specialist on why better communication is so needed between doctors and patients facing end-of-life issues.

Two Weeks In: The U.S. Government Under President Trump

Friday, Feb 03 2017President Trump announces his nominee for the Supreme Court, legal battles ramp up in opposition to the Trump's executive order on immigration restrictions,and some in Congress vow to resist: Three political experts speculate on the future of our three branches of government and their respective powers in the Trump administration.