In this Dec. 11, 2012 file photo, a protester, wearing a Michigan Education Association helmet, walks past Michigan State Police at the State Capitol in Lansing, Mich., in an unsuccessful effort to block passage of right-to-work legislation that bans labor agreements that require employees to pay fees to the unions that represent them. The Wisconsin Senate approved a right-to-work bill this week.

In this Dec. 11, 2012 file photo, a protester, wearing a Michigan Education Association helmet, walks past Michigan State Police at the State Capitol in Lansing, Mich., in an unsuccessful effort to block passage of right-to-work legislation that bans labor agreements that require employees to pay fees to the unions that represent them. The Wisconsin Senate approved a right-to-work bill this week.

Over the weekend, a few thousand union members gathered outside the statehouse in Wisconsin. They were there to voice their opposition to so called right-to-work legislation. If signed into law, which is expected, Wisconsin would become the 25th state with right-to-work laws on the books. These laws ban workers from having to pay union dues. Organized labor leaders say it’s another blow to their diminishing numbers. Supporters say the laws attract business and are good for economic development. Guest host Tom Gjelten and our guests discuss right-to-work laws and the future of unions.

Guests

  • Melanie Trottman reporter, The Wall Street Journal
  • Philip Dine journalist and author of "State of the Unions"
  • Ross Eisenbrey vice president, Economic Policy Institute
  • Matt Patterson executive director, Center for Worker Freedom

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