A close up taken on March 12, 2014 at the University Hospital in Dijon, eastern France, shows a 3D printer used for the reproduction of the skull of a patient. Dijon's pioneer surgery service uses a 3D printer to prepare tailored facial implants with greater precision, and to reduce operation length.

A close up taken on March 12, 2014 at the University Hospital in Dijon, eastern France, shows a 3D printer used for the reproduction of the skull of a patient. Dijon's pioneer surgery service uses a 3D printer to prepare tailored facial implants with greater precision, and to reduce operation length.

Bioengineers are creating human body parts to replace organs and manage life-threatening diseases. How techniques like 3-D printing and stem cell research are driving medical advances and raising ethical questions

Guests

  • Dr. Anthony Atala Director, Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine; and professor and chair, Department of Urology at Wake Forest University
  • Debra Mathews, Ph.D. Assistant director for science programs, Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics
  • Dr. Jason Spector Director, Laboratory for Bioregenerative Medicine and Surgery and associate professor, plastic surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College (NYC)

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