For decades, Americans have been told to limit the amount of cholesterol they consume. The thinking was that eating foods with high cholesterol put people at higher risk for heart disease. That meant no eggs, no bacon and no butter. Now the science is shifting and more and more doctors believe that cholesterol consumed does not necessarily have a direct impact on cholesterol levels in the body. The government could follow suit when they issue upcoming dietary guidelines. Diane and her guests discuss new science on cholesterol and how consumers can make healthy choices.

Guests

  • Dr. Thomas Sherman Associate professor of pharmacology at Georgetown University Medical Center.
  • Allison Aubrey Correspondent, NPR.
  • Cameron Wells Acting director of nutrition education, Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine.
  • Dr. Steven Nissen Chairman of Cardiovascular Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic.

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