This 2014 photo shows Felue Chang receiving a checkup at the South Broward Community Health Services clinic in Hollywood, Florida.

This 2014 photo shows Felue Chang receiving a checkup at the South Broward Community Health Services clinic in Hollywood, Florida.

According to a recent Kaiser Family Foundation poll, 92 percent of Americans believe it’s important to see their doctor at least once a year for a head-to-toe physical examination. About 45 million Americans do just that. Conventional wisdom deems the annual physical to be valuable for early detection of disease and general well-being. But many doctors and medical researchers have begun to question the efficacy of an annual physical. They say it’s too costly for the U.S. health care system. And some go so far as to say it’s worthless for the patient. We look at rethinking the annual physical exam.

Guests

  • Dr. Kavita Patel Fellow and managing director, the Brookings Institution Center for Health Policy; primary care physician at Johns Hopkins Medicine.
  • Jenny Gold Correspondent, Kaiser Health News.
  • Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel Chair of Medical Ethics and Health Policy at the University of Pennsylvania and author of “Reinventing American Healthcare."

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