A candlelight vigil in support of Dr. Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her when they were in high school.

A candlelight vigil in support of Dr. Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her when they were in high school.

On Thursday, the country heard for the first time from Christine Blasey Ford, the woman who has alleged Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her in high school. After her testimony, Kavanaugh faced questions from senators.

As of Friday morning it appeared that Kavanaugh would still be confirmed. As of Friday afternoon, things had changed.

Diane talks with USA Today’s Susan Page about what the wild week in Washington says about partisan divides, women’s anger, and how things have (and haven’t) changed since Anita Hill.

Guests

  • Susan Page Washington bureau chief, USA Today

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