House lawmakers voted to create an independent commission to investigate the January 6 U.S. Capitol assault, but the bill is facing steep opposition from Republicans in the Senate.

House lawmakers voted to create an independent commission to investigate the January 6 U.S. Capitol assault, but the bill is facing steep opposition from Republicans in the Senate.

Back in February, a bipartisan consensus emerged in Congress about how to seek accountability for the violence at the U.S. Capitol.

Lawmakers from both sides of the aisle supported the creation of a 9/11-style commission to dig into the many lingering questions about that day. Last week, the House passed a bill to create a panel of independent investigators, but Senate Republicans now signal they will not support it.

Ryan Goodman is a law professor at New York University School of Law. He joined Diane Tuesday morning to explain why he believes creating a commission is the best way forward and what alternatives are if that doesn’t happen.

Guests

  • Ryan Goodman Founding co-editor-in-chief of Just Security; chaired professor of law at New York University School of Law; special counsel to the General Counsel of the Department of Defense from 2015-2016.

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