In nineteen-fifty-nine, America suffered its first casualties in the Vietnam War, the microchip was invented, and Motown was about to change American music. How the events of that year laid the foundation for free-love, political protests, and the rise of new art-forms.

Guests

  • Fred Kaplan Writes the "War Stories" column in Slate.com, contributes frequently to the "New York Times," and blogs for "Stereophile." A Pulitzer-Prize winning former "Boston Globe" reporter, he is also the author of "Daydream Believers."

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