Loretta Lynch, the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York, testifies Jan. 28 before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.

Loretta Lynch, the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York, testifies Jan. 28 before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.

It’s already been more than four months since President Barack Obama nominated Loretta Lynch to be the next U.S. attorney general. Now a Senate stalemate threatens to extend that delay. Majority leader Mitch McConnell said this week there will be no vote on Lynch until the Senate passes a contested human trafficking bill, but Democrats refuse to move forward, opposed to a provision barring abortion funding. Both sides could take a political hit for the delay, Democrats for blocking what was to be a rare bipartisan bill and Republicans for appearing to hold up the historic nomination of the country’s first black woman as attorney general. We look at what’s behind the stalled nomination of Loretta Lynch.

Guests

  • Ron Elving Senior Washington editor, NPR.
  • Eleanor Clift Political writer, The Daily Beast. She is a regular panelist on the McLaughlin Group.
  • Stephen Dinan Congressional bureau chief, The Washington Times.

Related Links

Topics + Tags

Comments

comments powered by Disqus
Most Recent Shows

Untangling The Lies Of Rep. George Santos

Thursday, Jan 19 2023Behind the lies of Congressman George Santos. Diane talks to the owner of the small weekly paper that first broke the story, and a Washington Post journalist who is following the money to see who financed Santos's political rise.