The toxic coal ash turned the Dan River gray for 20 miles east of the North Carolina border.

The toxic coal ash turned the Dan River gray for 20 miles east of the North Carolina border.

Six years ago, a dam in Tennessee holding back a billion gallons of coal ash from a power plant broke. More than 300 acres were covered in sludge. Homes were destroyed. Environmentalists say it was one of the largest toxic spills in history. In response, the Environmental Protection Agency pledged to pass safeguards. Yet there are still no federal regulations on coal ash disposal. And there have been more major spills, including one this year in North Carolina on the Dan River. A court ordered the E.P.A to finalize new rules this month. A discussion about regulating coal ash.

Guests

  • Manuel Quinones Reporter covering mining and coal issues, Greenwire
  • Lisa Evans Senior administrative counsel, Earthjustice.
  • James Roewer Executive director, Utility Solid Waste Activities Group

Video: The Secret Threat Of Coal Ash

Earth Justice released a four-part video series called “An Ill Wind,” which tells the story of the Paiute Indians.

The tribe’s home, the Moapa River Indian Reservation, is just 300 yards from the landfills and coal ash ponds that surround the Reid Gardener Power Station, about 30 miles north of Las Vegas.

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