A group of protesters gather at the state capitol in Connecticut to oppose vaccination requirements.

A group of protesters gather at the state capitol in Connecticut to oppose vaccination requirements.

In the early days of the pandemic, public health officials pointed to Covid-19 vaccines as the “silver bullet” that could return our country to some sense of normalcy.

The main question back then was whether scientists could create a safe and effective formula fast enough.

Today, the United States faces a new set of questions: How to overcome vaccine hesitancy? What role should federal and state governments play in requiring vaccinations? Should we prioritize booster shots for Americans, or should we make sure those living in other countries get a first dose?

Lawrence Gostin is an expert on global health law at Goergetown University. He joined Diane to help explain the legal and health implications surrounding these questions.

Guests

  • Lawrence Gostin Director, O’Neill Institute for National & Global Health Law at Georgetown University Law School; director, World Health Organization Collaborating Center on Public Health Law & Human Rights; author of "Global Health Security"

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