A man waves an American flag at a rally supporting President Trump on January 9, 2021.

A man waves an American flag at a rally supporting President Trump on January 9, 2021.

What are Americans so angry about? This is a question that New Yorker staff writer Evan Osnos asks in his latest book, “Wildland: the Making of America’s Fury.”

Osnos’ deep research inside three very different communities — Greenwich, Connecticut, Clarksburg, West Virginia, and Chicago, Illinois — sheds new light on why the United States seems as deeply divided as anytime in recent history. He details both the sources of our disconnectedness, and the sometimes inadvertent ways we impact one another.

Evan Osnos joined Diane to talk about why deep tensions between individual freedoms and the common good are roiling our nation and what, if anything, could lead to change.

Guests

  • Evan Osnos Staff writer, The New Yorker; author of "Wildland: The Making of America's Fury"

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