Pro and anti-gay rights protest outside the U.S. Supreme Court on April 28, 2015 in Washington, DC.

Pro and anti-gay rights protest outside the U.S. Supreme Court on April 28, 2015 in Washington, DC.

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday in a case that could determine if the Constitution guarantees same-sex partners the right to marry. Supporters consider it to be one of the great civil rights issues of the century. Many on both sides believe it should be decided by the states, not the Supreme Court. At the moment, 36 states and the District of Columbia allow same-sex marriage. The Supreme Court is also considering whether all states must recognize same-sex marriages performed in states where they are legal. We look at a divided court, the Constitution and the right of gays and lesbians to marry.

Guests

  • Nan Hunter Professor of law, Georgetown University Law Center; distinguished scholar at the Williams Institute at UCLA; contributor to The Nation magazine.
  • Jeffrey Rosen President and CEO, The National Constitution Center; professor, George Washington University Law School; legal affairs editor, The New Republic; author of "The Supreme Court: The Personalities and Rivalries that Defined America" and co-editor, "Constitution 3.0."
  • Edward Whelan President, Ethics and Public Policy Center; contributor to National Review Online Bench Memos blog; former law clerk to Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia.
  • Stuart Taylor Author and journalist; nonresident senior fellow, The Brookings Institution; co-author of "Mismatch: How Affirmative Action Hurts Students It's Intended to Help, and Why Universities Won't Admit It."

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