People lay candles during a gathering on the Place de Republique (Republic square) in Paris, on January 8, 2015, as a tribute to the 12 people killed by two gunmen at the French weekly newspaper Charlie Hebdo's editorial office.

People lay candles during a gathering on the Place de Republique (Republic square) in Paris, on January 8, 2015, as a tribute to the 12 people killed by two gunmen at the French weekly newspaper Charlie Hebdo's editorial office.

France mourns the deaths of 12 people killed in a terrorist attack at a satirical weekly. French authorities seek to piece together what led to the killings and the extent, if any, of outside involvement. There are growing concerns over the economic health of the Eurozone nations. Mexico’s president makes an official call on the White House for talks on immigration, drug violence and trade. Iran’s supreme leader warns that the U.S. cannot be trusted to lift sanctions in a nuclear deal. And the FBI’s director says there’s little doubt North Korea was behind the hacking of Sony. A panel of journalists joins Diane for analysis of the week’s top international news stories.

Guests

  • Eleanor Beardsley Paris correspondent, NPR.
  • James Kitfield Contributing editor, National Journal, Atlantic Media's Defense One and the National Interest; senior fellow at the Center for the Study of the Presidency and Congress.
  • Helene Cooper Reporter with The New York Times and author of "The House at Sugar Beach: In Search of a Lost African Childhood"
  • Greg Myre International editor, NPR.org; co-author of "This Burning Land: Lessons from the Front Lines of the Transformed Israeli-Palestinian Conflict."
  • Olivier Knox Chief Washington correspondent, Yahoo! News.

Highlights

  • Listen 33:31

    NPR Correspondent Eleanor Beardsley joined us live from Paris to describe the hostage situations as they unfolded.

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